Agoraphobia



It is a type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped, helpless or embarrassed. You fear an actual or anticipated situation, such as using public transportation, being in open or enclosed spaces, standing in line, or being in a crowd.

Typical characteristics

The agoraphobic situations are actively avoided, require the presence of a companion or are endured with intense fear or anxiety.

The fear or anxiety is out of proportion to the actual danger posed by the agoraphobic situations.

The fear, anxiety or avoidance is persistent typically for 6 months or more

The condition causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning.


Situations that cause anxiety

  • Using public transportation (can be automobiles, buses, trains, ships, planes)
  • Being in open spaces (parking lots, marketplaces, bridges)
  • Being in enclosed places (shops, theatres, cinemas)
  • Standing in line or being in a crowd
  • Being outside of the home alone


The individual fears or avoids these situations because of thoughts that escape might be difficult or help might not be available in the event of developing panic-like symptoms or other incapacitating or embarrassing symptoms (fear of falling in the elderly, fear of incontinence).


WHAT TREATMENT HELPS?
The effectiveness of psychotherapies on reducing anxiety, stress and phobia is well established. In particular, cognitive behaviour therapy and clinical hypnotherapy have shown the most encouraging results.

HOW EFFECTIVE IS OUR TREATMENT?
Our panel has highly trained and qualified mental health professionals with competence as either cognitive behaviour therapists, clinical hypnotherapists, clinical and counselling psychologists. They have the necessary skills, competence and experience to help people overcome difficulties after determining the type of disorder and the right approach for that condition.
Medication is not usually recommended in the treatment of mild to moderate psychological problems. However, in some cases, it may be helpful to consider a combined approach of counselling and medication and we will advise on the right way to go about it.